‘I’m a parent who’s delighted smoking is being stubbed out – the nanny state naysayers are wrong’

By Staff 6 Min Read

The historic ban on smoking blocks anyone born after January 1, 2009 from buying cigarettes, with the age limit rising each year – kids aged 15 or younger will never be able to buy them

Quick, buy Britain a Nicotine patch, we’re quitting smoking (albeit rather slowly).

But you can’t expect an entire nation to go cold turkey – imagine how irritable everyone would be. In a rare moment of logic from the government, MPs have voted to outlaw this deadly habit, stubbing out a massive health problem. The historic move blocks anyone born after January 1, 2009 from buying cigarettes, with the age limit rising each year – kids aged 15 or younger will never be able to buy them.

Addicted adults can carry on, but I bet most wish they’d never started. The 2007 indoor smoking ban did well to literally freeze out a few social puffers, but the dangerous habit still kills 80,000 Brits a year. This phase-out is a game changer and as a parent, I am relieved and grateful.

I worry that kids vape now – but The Tobacco and Vaping Bill will also limit vapes that get kids hooked on nicotine. When I was at school, in the days of teens smoking behind bike sheds, friends would push you to “just try it”. Refusing a drag made you a drag – you had to be bold to say no.

My kids will also never have to experience coming home from a night out, with clothes and hair absolutely reeking of revolting smoke. I have always hated smoking, moving away from the cloud of fumes if someone sparks up nearby. I may have gone slightly too far with my anti-smoker moaning to my kids.

When they were toddlers, if they saw a smoker approaching in the street they’d yell and point: “SMOKER! CROSS THE ROAD!” Marginally embarrassing. As this ban comes in, there are some nay-sayers who shout about the nanny state and freedom of choice.

But why, if there is not one single redeeming quality? It’s killing people, it costs a fortune and the health impact is a drain on our NHS. Some MPs opposed the bill, fearing a ban could create a dangerous black market, but surely a legal block will stop most youngsters taking up the habit?

The only upside to smoking was that it made John Travolta look sexy in Grease. (See also, Pulp Fiction). But that may have just been the tight trousers. Chandler summed it up perfectly in Friends when he yelled: “I’ve had it with you guys and your cancer
and your emphysema and your heart disease. The bottom line is, smoking is cool and you know it.”

Nailed it. And no, it’s not even cool anymore. This health intervention will save lives and I’m thrilled to see the government kicking butt.

Share This Article
Leave a comment